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Using Snippets and Script Libraries to Monitor AWS APIs

By Heitor Tashiro Sergent on .

One of the most common programming principles that we learn as developers is to generally avoid repeating yourself, or DRY. Copy-pasting the same lines of code is replaced with creating abstractions in the form of methods or functions that can be used and re-used in multiple places across a project, which in turn will make your code easier to understand and modify.

That same idea of avoiding repeating code can be applied to Runscope API monitors by using our Snippets and Script Libraries feature.

A few months ago we added the aws4.js library to our script-libraries repository and...

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Categories: howto, tutorial, monitoring


Design Thinking and Wicked Problems for APIs

Design Thinking and Wicked Problems for APIs

By Ash Hathaway on .

This is a post from our Featured Guest Series! Ash Hathaway shares her experience as a former developer turned product manager for APIs, and how design thinking has helped her team solves difficult technical problems.

If you're interested in sharing your knowledge on our blog, check out our Featured Guest Series page for more details.

You may have heard of design thinking or even participated in a workshop using lots of sticky notes. Done correctly design thinking is an insanely fun way to generate tons of ideas with your team, create buy-in, and leapfrog ideas all centered around your user. So, what is it? And why does it matter for APIs?

Design thinking is a way to solve complex and multidimensional problems smarter together. The roots of design thinking are in human-computer interaction design which evolved into a framework to innovation. More specifically it touts methods to find overlap in business strategy, technological feasibility, and user needs. It is a “process for creative problem solving,” according to IDEO, an international design consulting firm and large proponent (some might say the OG) of design thinking in mainstream tech today. 

Why design thinking makes sense for APIs

So what does this have to do with APIs? APIs are like super technical and deal with code. That has zero to do with...

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Categories: featured guest series, community, apis


How to Sync your OpenAPI Schema in Stoplight with GitHub and Runscope

How to Sync your OpenAPI Schema in Stoplight with GitHub and Runscope

By Glen Semino on .

This is a post from our Featured Guest Series! Glen Semino shows how to combine Stoplight and GitHub APIs with Runscope to keep your OpenAPI Schema always versioned and up to date.

If you're interested in sharing your knowledge on our blog, check out our Featured Guest Series page for more details.

About a month ago after I and part of the SYNQ team attended the APIDays SF conference, we reflected on what we had learned at the conference. One of the things we realized was that our API spec documentation needed quite a bit of improvement. And among the tools discussed in the conference was Stoplight, which helps one design, document, mock, and test APIs. 

We decided to give Stoplight a try to rewrite and edit our API spec. Once we started, I noticed that I was often manually syncing our Open API spec (OAS) file that Stoplight generates with our GitHub repo. I wanted a way to automate this process so that regardless of what gets edited/changed in Stoplight, Stoplight and GitHub are always in sync. 

This is where Runscope came to save the day. Using the export function Stoplight offers in addition to GitHub’s API, I was able to automate syncing our Stoplight OAS spec file with our GitHub repo every minute using Runscope. In this tutorial, we're going to walk through this workflow step-by-step so that you can do it too!

The Setup

These are the things you will need to do to create the necessary API requests in Runscope to automate the syncing process...

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Categories: code samples, howto, monitoring, openapi


Runscope is Joining CA Technologies!

By John Sheehan on .

Today I’m excited to announce that Runscope has been acquired by CA Technologies. We’re bringing our market-leading API monitoring tools to CA to further our shared mission of equipping developers with the tools they need to deliver and operate mission-critical APIs powering the modern enterprise.

Five years ago, Frank and I saw an opportunity to build a new class of developer tools for modern, API-driven applications. We were joined by a fantastic group of investors and team members passionate about building great products driven by an obsession with customer success.

Today, Runscope is used by over 1,200 customers to run 17,000,000 API uptime and data validation checks every day. Companies of all sizes...

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Categories: announcements


Playing with Node.js and the Runscope API on Glitch

Playing with Node.js and the Runscope API on Glitch

By Heitor Tashiro Sergent on .

I've been wanting to create a project on Glitch for quite some time. Glitch is a startup/product/friendly community where you can create and remix Node.js projects, use an online code editor to personalize them, and you don't have to worry about hosting or deployment. And it's free! It's a really great way to start a project and prototype an idea, without having to worry about those million little things that can get in the way of your dream app.

I thought it'd be fun to share a few projects I made using the Runscope API, and how you can use them to extend Runscope functionality or create custom features for use cases you might have, like creating a custom dashboard that displays API metrics using C3.js.

Here we'll take a look at three projects:

  • runscope-oauth - Uses Passport.js + passport-oauth2 + the Runscope API authentication.
  • runscope-batch-edit - Remix of runscope-oauth, uses the Runscope API to get a list of user buckets + list of tests in a bucket + set multiple tests schedules + set multiple tests default environments.
  • runscope-api-metric - Remix of runscope-oauth, uses the Runscope API to get a test's metrics information (avg. response time, success ratio, etc.)...

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Categories: apis, code samples, howto


Tutorial - Converting your Swagger 2.0 API Definition to OpenAPI 3.0

Tutorial - Converting your Swagger 2.0 API Definition to OpenAPI 3.0

By Heitor Tashiro Sergent on .

At the end of July, the OpenAPI Specification 3.0.0 was finally released by the Open API Initiative. It's a major release, and after 3 years in the making, it brings about a lot of improvements over the 2.0 specification, making it possible to create definitions for a broader range of APIs.

What's New in OpenAPI 3.0.0

There're a lot of new features that were added to this version, such as...

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Categories: apis, tutorial, swagger, openapi


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